What is a Net Promoter Score (NPS), and why should a positive NPS matter to your organization? At its core, a NPS measures the willingness of customers to recommend a company’s products or services to others. It should be a significant pillar of your Customer Experience (CX) strategy. If you cannot measure your CX strategy’s ongoing success, you cannot adjust constantly to improve it.  

Here are five key reasons why Net Promoter Score is important in the contact center: 

1. Identify detractors 

If a customer is happy with your products or services, they are more likely to remain a loyal customer. NPS is a globally accepted and understood measurement tool that provides you with the information to identify happy and satisfied customers. More importantly, it allows you to identify those customers that are detractors. As important as it is to keep customers happy, it is equally important to identify dissatisfied customers. By identifying dissatisfied customers and understanding the cause of their dissatisfaction, you can modify your CX strategy. You might not win those dissatisfied customers back in the short term, but you can leverage this information to avoid any additional detractors in the long term.

2. Gain new customers 

Many organizations use their NPS scores to help grow their business. A well designed and properly implemented NPS provides your marketing teams with the critical data points they require for the development of new campaigns and initiatives. They can see what real customers think of the current marketing campaigns as well as the strengths and weaknesses of your company’s products or services. This real customer feedback is invaluable when designing any new marketing or product/service initiative.

3. Emphasize customer-centricity 

It is critical for organizations that they leverage their NPS scores to reflect their focus on being customer centric. In today’s hyper-connected and hyper-competitive world, the consumer has greater purchasing power and choices than ever before. If a consumer feels that a company does not have their best interests at heart, they will not purchase from them. In turn, they could also share their dissatisfaction on social media. Once a company has been branded as being difficult to deal with, it is tough for a company to change that narrative. A NPS tool needs to be monitored, constantly reviewed, and modified based on your customer’s feedback.

4. Create a channel for communication 

Consumers want to be heard and feel that what they are saying is important. A NPS tool is not a one-way street where the company simply gathers information for their own use. The tool should be used to create two-way communication with both your most loyal customers and those dissatisfied customers. Whether it be by email, a phone call, or in person, it’s important to maintain the human touch, especially in today’s uncertain environment. The human touch provides the ability for a lasting relationship and trust to be developed between the two parties. This can go a long way in sales since there is an opportunity to establish a connection at all stages of the sales cycle.   

5. Use NPS for customer service analytics 

It cannot be overstated the importance of having real data points from your actual customers. Regardless of the feedback being good or bad, the information is critical for the ongoing development of your Customer Journey mapping. You are no longer making decisions based on a hunch or a gut feeling. Instead, you can mine the data to identify opportunity to improve both your short and long-term CX models. 

If you have any questions about your current CX model, or would like to learn more about how best-of-breed CCaaS platforms can help you understand and leverage your Net Promoter Score, contact Wilmac.